Tuesday, 2 October 2012

Review: How to Romance a Rake by Manda Collins


How to Romance a Rake
Series: Ugly Ducklings #2
Author:  Manda Collins
Publisher:  St Martin’s Press
Pages: 336
Format: ebook
Source: Purchased

Rating:

Reason chosen:

I read the first book and I liked it.

Summary taken from Chapters/Indigo.ca:

You can lead a wallflower to the ball, but you can't make her bloom-unless one daring young bachelor turns up the heat…
What's a nice girl like Miss Juliet Shelby doing at a place like Lord Deveril's ballroom? With her shy demeanor, she's a total stranger to the dance floor and a source of mockery for the ton. So imagine her surprise when Deveril gallantly comes to her defense-and offers to teach her to dance! Juliet can hardly believe the most handsome bachelor in London would notice her, until he takes her in his arms and sets her heart ablaze…
Lord Alec Deveril has never felt such a spark of attraction for an unmarried lady before. Unlike the "fashionable" ladies he's accustomed to, Juliet possesses a generous spirit, a fiery intelligence-and an explosive secret. Deep in the London underworld, a dear friend has vanished, and Juliet fears the worst. Deveril insists on helping, escorting her through the darkest alleys in town. But he too is hiding a shocking secret-and the only way he can defeat the devil in his past is to seduce the angel in his arms…

Review:

I have to say I love it when the Wallflower gets the guy. Juliet is not like Cecily. She is shy and not argumentative, and its from a life of being put down. So you have to love it when a guy (THE guy of society) falls for her. Then there is the romance. The first novel was filed with passion. I loved it. Cecily and Lucas are meant for each other. This one has romance. It has Alec and Juliet getting to know each other and Alec marrying her for reason other than he “ruined” her. I found the first book filled with passion and this book filled with romance. I also liked the Villain in this novel more. I was surprised…I couldn’t actually figure out who the bad guy was in this novel until it was all revealed. Manda Collins knows how to bring a story line along with her romance. Although sometimes I found bits boring, my mind was constantly working and trying to figure out just what exactly was going on.

Good:

Alec—He is very different from Winterson and very different from they way he is seen in society.
Juliet—she hides a secret and I absolutely love that she is the wallflower that gets to show up society
Winterson and Cecily—They are still around and I love it
Monteith—he is starting to grow on me. I love his humour

Bad:

The multiple names. Winterson is not Lucas’s first name. Its not his last name either. And sometimes he gets called by all three. I believe in this novel Alec doesn’t have as many, but because Cecily and Winterson are still in this novel well it gets all typed of confusing some times.  Also some parts were a bit boring.

Overall (Writing style, story line, and general):

Overall I loved the romance and the story line. I found the characters enjoyable and all unique. Manda Collins really does know how to add a mystery onto her romance and make a rather enjoyable, although long, read. I can not wait for the third one in the novel

Previously in the Series:

How to Dance With a Duke (#1)->Click for review

Next In the Series:

How to Entice and Earl (#3)-> Click for review
The Perks of Being a Beauty (#3.5)-> Click for review

Viewer Type Recommendation:

If you love the time of Jane Austen, and are a lover or mystery, romance, and historical pieces this is for you.

If you liked this you'll probably love:

Ransom My Heart by Meg Cabot, Tailor-Made Bride and Short-Straw Bride by Karen Witemeyer, Once Burned by Jeaniene Frost, Daughters of Glen series by Melissa Mayhue

Read Completely:
Yes

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2 comments:

  1. I liked your review and the way you listed the things you like and the things you did not. I have noticed in the MANY historicals that I have read, that the men often have multiple names. They have their given first & last names, and then their title name. Any or all of these can be what they are called, depending often on who is saying their names.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! I guess its something I will have to get use to if I'm going to continue reading the historical genre

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